SAN FRANCISCO and INDIANAPOLIS and SUZHOU, China, March 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Innovent Biologics, Inc. (“Innovent”, HKEX: 01801), a world-class biopharmaceutical company that develops, manufactures and commercializes high-quality medicines for the treatment of cancer, metabolic, autoimmune and other major diseases, and Eli Lilly and Company (“Lilly”, NYSE: LLY) today announced that in light of both parties’ shared commitment to continue bringing innovative medicines to benefit Chinese patients and to leverage the strengths of each party in a win-win manner, parties will now expand the strategic partnership through:

i) an agreement for Innovent to obtain the sole commercialization rights to import, market, promote, distribute and detail Cyramza® (ramucirumab) and Retsevmo® (selpercatinib) once approved in Mainland China, and
ii) a right of first negotiation granted to Innovent for potential future commercialization of Pirtobrutinib in Mainland China.

Cyramza® (ramucirumab) was the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatment for patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior chemotherapy and the first FDA approved biomarker-driven therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In China, Cyramza® (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel was approved by National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) for second-line treatment in patients with advanced or metastatic GEJ adenocarcinoma in March 2022, making it the first and only drug approved for the second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer in China. The New Drug Application (NDA) for Cyramza® (ramucirumab) as second-line treatment in patients with HCC with baseline alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) ≥400ng/mL following first-line sorafenib was accepted by NMPA in September 2021. Gastric cancer and liver cancer are the third and fifth largest cancers in terms of incidence with a total of approximately 900,000 new cases yearly in China. Most of the patients experience disease progression on or after first-line treatment. There is an unmet medical need for new treatment options to improve outcomes in these patients.

Retsevmo® (selpercatinib) is a highly selective and potent rearranged during transfection (RET) inhibitor. It was approved by FDA, under the brand name Retevmo, as the first therapy specifically indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic RET fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older with advanced or metastatic RET-mutant medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) who require systemic therapy, and adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older with advanced or metastatic RET fusion-positive thyroid cancer who require systemic therapy and  who are radioactive iodine-refractory (if radioactive iodine is appropriate). In China, the NDA for Retsevmo® (selpercatinib) for the above indications was accepted by NMPA and granted priority review in August 2021.

According to the agreement, Innovent has the sole commercialization rights for both Cyramza® and Retsevmo®, once approved in China, of which Innovent will be fully responsible for the pricing, importation, marketing, distribution and detailing of these two products. With a further expanded oncology product portfolio, Innovent intends to use its experienced oncology commercial team to leverage its broad commercial coverage in hospitals and pharmacies at various tiers to make these novel treatment options available to cancer patients in China.

In addition, Lilly has granted a right of first negotiation to Innovent for the potential future commercialization of pirtobrutinib in China. Pirtobrutinib is an investigational, oral, highly selective, non-covalent (reversible) Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor being studied globally for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).

Under the terms of the agreement, upon regulatory approvals of Cyramza® in the hepatocellular carcinoma indication and Retsevmo® in the non-small lung cancer indication, Innovent will make payments of US$45 million in total and then intends to commercialize Cyramza® and Retsevmo® in China.

Dr. Michael Yu, Founder, Chairman and CEO of Innovent, stated, “With our long-term strategic partnership with Lilly as a strong foundation, we are excited to further expand our productive relationship through this agreement. Innovent has built up a robust oncology pipeline of over 20 clinical stage assets, an industry-leading medical operations and regulatory affairs team, a broad commercial channel and a professional commercial team of about 3,000 people. Lilly and Innovent have jointly launched and marketed TYVYT® (sintilimab) and HALPRYZA® (rituximab biosimilar) successfully in China. The addition of Cyramza® and Retsevmo®, two potential differentiated products, will potentially further expand our oncology portfolio to seven commercialized products by this year, enabling us to provide integrated patient solutions with strong portfolio synergies while enhancing our franchise in large cancer indications including NSCLC, GC and HCC, and potentially in hematological malignancies as well. With Innovent and Lilly’s joint commitment and effort, we hope to make these new treatment options available to benefit more cancer patients in China as soon as possible.”

Julio Gay-Ger, President and General Manager of Lilly China, said, “We are very proud of this agreement with Innovent, which is a key long-term strategic partner in China. Oncology is one of Lilly’s core therapeutic areas globally, in which the partnership between the two parties has seen rich fruits in the past several years. We are very confident that through this agreement, Innovent can bring forward Lilly’s innovative medicines to potentially be able to benefit Chinese patients with gastric cancer and lung cancer, helping them live better lives and help realize the ‘Healthy China 2030’goals.”

About Innovent

Inspired by the spirit of “Start with Integrity, Succeed through Action,” Innovent’s mission is to develop, manufacture and commercialize high-quality biopharmaceutical products that are affordable to ordinary people. Established in 2011, Innovent is committed to developing, manufacturing and commercializing high-quality innovative medicines for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune, metabolic and other major diseases. On October 31, 2018, Innovent was listed on the Main Board of the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited with the stock code: 01801.HK.

Since its inception, Innovent has developed a fully integrated multi-functional platform which includes R&D, CMC (Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls), clinical development and commercialization capabilities. Leveraging the platform, the company has built a robust pipeline of 32 valuable assets in the fields of cancer, metabolic, autoimmune disease and other major therapeutic areas, with 7 products approved for marketing in China – TYVYT® (sintilimab injection), BYVASDA® (bevacizumab biosimilar injection), SULINNO® (adalimumab biosimilar injection), HALPRYZA® (rituximab biosimilar injection) , Pemazyre® (pemigatinib oral inhibitor), olverembatinib (BCR ABL TKI) and Cyramza® (ramucirumab),  1 asset under NMPA NDA review, 5 assets in Phase 3 or pivotal clinical trials, and an additional 19 molecules in clinical studies.

Innovent has built an international team with advanced talent in high-end biological drug development and commercialization, including many global experts. The company has also entered into strategic collaborations with Eli Lilly and Company, Adimab, Incyte, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Hanmi and other international partners. Innovent strives to work with many collaborators to help advance China’s biopharmaceutical industry, improve drug availability and enhance the quality of the patients’ lives. For more information, please visit: www.innoventbio.com. and www.linkedin.com/company/innovent-biologics/.

About Eli Lilly and Company

Lilly is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to create medicines to make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by a man committed to creating high-quality medicines that meet real needs, and today we remain true to that mission in all our work. Across the globe, Lilly employees work to discover and bring life-changing medicines to those who need them, improve the understanding and management of disease, and give back to communities through philanthropy and volunteerism. To learn more about Lilly, please visit us at www.lilly.com and http://newsroom.lilly.com/social-channels.

About Eli Lilly and Company’s strategic cooperation with Innovent Biologics

Lilly entered into a strategic collaboration with Innovent focused on biological medicine in March 2015 – a groundbreaking partnership between a Chinese pharmaceutical company and a multinational pharmaceutical company. Under the agreement, Lilly and Innovent will co-develop and commercialize oncology medicines, including Tyvyt® (sintilimab injection) in China. In October 2015, the two companies announced the extension of their existing collaboration to include co-development of three additional oncology antibodies targeting oncology indications. In August 2019, Innovent further entered into a licensing agreement with Lilly to develop and commercialize a potentially global best-in-class diabetes medicine in China. Its collaboration with Lilly indicates that Innovent has established a comprehensive level of cooperation between China’s innovative pharmaceuticals sector and the international pharmaceuticals sector in fields such as R&D, CMC, clinical development and commercialization. In August 2020,Lilly and Innovent announced a global expansion of their strategic alliance for sintilimab, whereby Lilly obtained an exclusive license for sintilimab for geographies outside of China and plans to pursue registration of sintilimab in the U.S. and other geographies outside of China. In March 2022, Lilly and Innovent entered into the fifth agreement to expand strategic partnership in oncology.

About Cyramza® (ramucirumab)

In the U.S., CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) has five FDA approvals to treat four different types of cancers. CYRAMZA is being investigated in a broad global development program that has enrolled more than 15,000 patients across more than 110 trials worldwide. These include several studies investigating CYRAMZA in combination with other anti-cancer therapies for the treatment of multiple tumor types.

CYRAMZA is an antiangiogenic therapy. It is a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Receptor 2 antagonist that binds specifically to VEGFR-2, thereby blocking the binding of the receptor ligands (VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D) – which may slow tumor growth. CYRAMZA inhibited angiogenesis in an in vivo animal model.

U.S. INDICATIONS FOR CYRAMZA

Gastric Cancer

CYRAMZA, as a single agent, or in combination with paclitaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy.

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

CYRAMZA, in combination with erlotinib, for first-line treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) mutations.

CYRAMZA, in combination with docetaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving CYRAMZA.

Colorectal Cancer

CYRAMZA, in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and fluorouracil), is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine.

Hepatocellular Carcinoma

CYRAMZA, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) of ≥400 ng/mL and have been treated with sorafenib.

About Re(t)sevmo® (selpercatinib)

Retsevmo (selpercatinib, formerly known as LOXO-292) is a selective and potent RET kinase inhibitor. Retsevmo may affect both tumor cells and healthy cells, which can result in side effects. In the U.S., Retevmo is an U.S. FDA-approved oral prescription medicine, 120 mg or 160 mg dependent on weight (<50 kg or ≥50 kg, respectively), taken twice daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Continued approval may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Genomic alterations in the RET kinase, which include fusions and activating point mutations, lead to overactive RET signaling and uncontrolled cell growth. RET fusions have been identified in approximately 2 percent of NSCLC; and 10-20 percent of papillary, Hurthle cell, anaplastic, and poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. Activating RET point mutations account for approximately 60 percent of sporadic MTC and approximately 90 percent of germline MTC. RET fusion-positive cancers and RET-mutant MTC are primarily dependent on this single activated kinase for their proliferation and survival. This dependency, often referred to as “oncogene addiction,” renders such tumors highly susceptible to small molecule inhibitors targeting RET. RET-driver alterations are predominantly mutually exclusive from other oncogenic drivers.

U.S. INDICATIONS FOR RETEVMO

Retevmo is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic rearranged during transfection fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older with advanced or metastatic RET-mutant medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) who require systemic therapy, or advanced or metastatic RET fusion-positive thyroid cancer who require systemic therapy and who are radioactive iodine-refractory (if radioactive iodine is appropriate). Retevmo was approved under the FDA’s Accelerated Approval regulations based on the LIBRETTO-001 Phase 1/2 trial’s endpoints of objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DoR).

U.S. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR CYRAMZA® (ramucirumab)

Warnings and Precautions

Hemorrhage

CYRAMZA increased the risk of hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage, including Grade ≥3 hemorrhagic events. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hemorrhage ranged from 13-55%. Grade 3-5 hemorrhage incidence ranged from 2-5%.

Patients with gastric cancer receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded from enrollment in REGARD and RAINBOW; therefore, the risk of gastric hemorrhage in CYRAMZA-treated patients with gastric tumors receiving NSAIDs is unknown.

Patients with NSCLC receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or with evidence of major airway invasion by cancer were excluded from REVEL. In addition, patients with NSCLC with a recent history of gross hemoptysis, those receiving chronic therapy with NSAIDs or other anti-platelet therapy other than once daily aspirin or with radiographic evidence of major blood vessel invasion or intratumor cavitation were excluded from REVEL and RELAY; therefore the risk of pulmonary hemorrhage in these groups of patients is unknown.

Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience severe (Grade 3 or 4) bleeding.

Gastrointestinal Perforations

CYRAMZA can increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation, a potentially fatal event. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade and Grade 3-5 gastrointestinal perforations ranged from <1-2%.

Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience a gastrointestinal perforation.

Impaired Wound Healing

CYRAMZA has the potential to adversely affect wound healing. CYRAMZA has not been studied in patients with serious or non-healing wounds.

Withhold CYRAMZA for 28 days prior to elective surgery. Do not administer CYRAMZA for at least 2 weeks following a major surgical procedure and until adequate wound healing. The safety of resumption of CYRAMZA after resolution of wound healing complications has not been established.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events (ATEs)

Serious, sometimes fatal, ATEs, including myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, cerebrovascular accident, and cerebral ischemia, occurred across clinical trials. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade ATE was 1-3%. Grade 3-5 ATE incidence was <1-2%.

Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience an ATE.

Hypertension

An increased incidence of severe hypertension occurred in patients receiving CYRAMZA. Across five clinical studies, excluding RELAY, in 1916 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hypertension ranged from 11-26%. Grade 3-5 hypertension incidence ranged from 6-15%. In 221 patients with NSCLC receiving CYRAMZA in combination with erlotinib in the RELAY study, the incidence of new or worsening hypertension was higher (45%), as was the incidence of Grade 3-5 hypertension (24%). Of the patients experiencing new or worsening hypertension in RELAY (N=100 CYRAMZA and erlotinib; N=27 placebo and erlotinib), 13% of those treated with CYRAMZA and erlotinib required initiation of 3 or more antihypertensive medications compared to 4% of patients treated with placebo and erlotinib.

Control hypertension prior to initiating treatment with CYRAMZA. Monitor blood pressure every two weeks or more frequently as indicated during treatment. Withhold CYRAMZA for severe hypertension until medically controlled. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for medically significant hypertension that cannot be controlled with antihypertensive therapy or in patients with hypertensive crisis or hypertensive encephalopathy.

Infusion-Related Reactions (IRR)

IRR, including severe and life-threatening IRR, occurred in CYRAMZA clinical trials. Symptoms of IRR included rigors/tremors, back pain/spasms, chest pain and/or tightness, chills, flushing, dyspnea, wheezing, hypoxia, and paresthesia. In severe cases, symptoms included bronchospasm, supraventricular tachycardia, and hypotension. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA in which premedication was recommended or required, the incidence of all Grade IRR ranged from <1- 9%. Grade 3-5 IRR incidence was <1%.

Premedicate prior to each CYRAMZA infusion. Monitor patients during the infusion for signs and symptoms of IRR in a setting with available resuscitation equipment. Reduce the infusion rate by 50% for Grade 1-2 IRR. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3- 4 IRR.

Worsening of Pre-existing Hepatic Impairment

Clinical deterioration, manifested by new onset or worsening encephalopathy, ascites, or hepatorenal syndrome, was reported in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis who received single agent CYRAMZA. Use CYRAMZA in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis only if the potential benefits of treatment are judged to outweigh the risks of clinical deterioration.

Based on safety data from REACH-2, in patients with Child-Pugh A liver cirrhosis, the pooled incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome was higher for patients who received CYRAMZA (6%) compared to patients who received placebo (0%).

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)

PRES (also known as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome [RPLS]) has been reported in <0.1% of 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA. Symptoms of PRES include seizure, headache, nausea/vomiting, blindness, or altered consciousness, with or without associated hypertension.

Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who develop PRES. Symptoms may resolve or improve within days, although some patients with PRES can experience ongoing neurologic sequelae or death.

Proteinuria Including Nephrotic Syndrome

In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade proteinuria ranged from 3-34%. Grade ≥3 proteinuria (including 4 patients with nephrotic syndrome) incidence ranged from <1-3%.

Monitor for proteinuria. Withhold CYRAMZA for urine protein levels that are 2 or more grams over 24 hours. Reinitiate CYRAMZA at a reduced dose once the urine protein level returns to less than 2 grams over 24 hours. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for urine protein levels greater than 3 grams over 24 hours or in the setting of nephrotic syndrome.

Thyroid Dysfunction

In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of Grade 1-2 hypothyroidism ranged from <1-3%; there were no reports of Grade 3-5 hypothyroidism. Monitor thyroid function during treatment with CYRAMZA.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

CYRAMZA can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 3 months after the last dose.

Lactation

Because of the potential risk for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children from ramucirumab, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 2 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

REGARD:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated gastric cancer patients at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo were hypertension (16% vs 8%), diarrhea (14% vs 9%), headache (9% vs 3%), and hyponatremia (6% vs 2%).

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were anemia (3.8%) and intestinal obstruction (2.1%). Red blood cell transfusions were given to 11% of CYRAMZA-treated patients vs 8.7% of patients who received placebo.

Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REGARD were neutropenia (4.7%), epistaxis (4.7%), rash (4.2%), intestinal obstruction (2.1%), and arterial thromboembolic events (1.7%).

Across clinical trials of CYRAMZA administered as a single agent, clinically relevant adverse reactions (including Grade ≥3) reported in CYRAMZA-treated patients included proteinuria, gastrointestinal perforation, and IRR. In REGARD, according to laboratory assessment, 8% of CYRAMZA-treated patients developed proteinuria vs 3% of placebo-treated patients. Two patients discontinued CYRAMZA due to proteinuria. The rate of gastrointestinal perforation in REGARD was 0.8% and the rate of IRR was 0.4%.

RAINBOW:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with paclitaxel were fatigue/asthenia (57% vs 44%), neutropenia (54% vs 31%), diarrhea (32% vs 23%), epistaxis (31% vs 7%), hypertension (25% vs 6%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), stomatitis (20% vs 7%), proteinuria (17% vs 6%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 6%), hypoalbuminemia (11% vs 5%), and gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (10% vs 6%).

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were neutropenia (3.7%) and febrile neutropenia (2.4%); 19% of patients who received CYRAMZA with paclitaxel received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors.

Adverse reactions resulting in discontinuation of any component of the CYRAMZA with paclitaxel combination in ≥2% of patients in RAINBOW were neutropenia (4%) and thrombocytopenia (3%).

Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were sepsis (3.1%), including 5 fatal events, and gastrointestinal perforations (1.2%), including 1 fatal event.

REVEL:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with docetaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with docetaxel were neutropenia (55% vs 46%), fatigue/asthenia (55% vs 50%), stomatitis/mucosal inflammation (37% vs 19%), epistaxis (19% vs 7%), febrile neutropenia (16% vs 10%), peripheral edema (16% vs 9%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 5%), lacrimation increased (13% vs 5%), and hypertension (11% vs 5%).

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with docetaxel were febrile neutropenia (14%), pneumonia (6%), and neutropenia (5%). The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors was 42% in CYRAMZA with docetaxel- treated patients versus 37% in patients who received placebo with docetaxel.

Treatment discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients (9%) than in placebo with docetaxel-treated patients (5%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were IRR (0.5%) and epistaxis (0.3%).

For patients with non-squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 7% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 1% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 6% overall incidence and 1% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel. For patients with squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 10% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 2% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 12% overall incidence and 2% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel.

Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients in REVEL were hyponatremia (4.8%) and proteinuria (3.3%).

RELAY:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with erlotinib at a rate of ≥ 5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with erlotinib were infections (81% vs 76%), diarrhea (70% vs 71%), hypertension (45% vs 12%), stomatitis (42% vs 36%), alopecia (34% vs 20%), epistaxis (34% vs 12%), proteinuria (34% vs 8%), peripheral edema (23% vs 4%), headache (15% vs 7%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (10% vs 3%), gingival bleeding (9% vs 1%), and pulmonary hemorrhage (7% vs 2%).

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with erlotinib were pneumonia (3.2%), cellulitis (1.8%), and pneumothorax (1.8%). Red blood cell transfusions were given to 3.2% of CYRAMZA-treated patients versus 0 patients who received placebo.

Treatment discontinuation of all study drugs due to adverse reactions occurred in 13% of CYRAMZA with erlotinib-treated patients, with increased alanine aminotransferase (1.4%) and paronychia (1.4%) being the most common. The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (8.6%) and hyperbilirubinemia (6%).

Of the 221 patients who received CYRAMZA with erlotinib, 119 (54%) were 65 and over, while 29 (13%) were 75 and over. Adverse reactions occurring at a 10% or higher incidence in patients receiving CYRAMZA with erlotinib and with a 10% or greater difference between patients aged 65 or older compared to patients aged less than 65 years were: diarrhea (75% versus 65%), hypertension (50% versus 40%), increased ALT (49% versus 35%), increased AST (49% versus 33%), stomatitis (46% versus 36%), decreased appetite (32% versus 19%), dysgeusia (23% versus 12%), and weight loss (19% versus 6%).

RAISE:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (60% vs 51%), neutropenia (59% vs 46%), decreased appetite (37% vs 27%), epistaxis (33% vs 15%), stomatitis (31% vs 21%), thrombocytopenia (28% vs 14%), hypertension (26% vs 9%), peripheral edema (20% vs 9%), proteinuria (17% vs 5%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (13% vs 5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (12% vs 7%), and hypoalbuminemia (6% vs 2%). Twenty percent of patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI received granulocyte colony- stimulating factors.

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (3.6%), intestinal obstruction (3.0%), and febrile neutropenia (2.8%).

Treatment discontinuation of any study drug due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients (29%) than in placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients (13%). The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of any component of CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI as compared to placebo with FOLFIRI were neutropenia (12.5% vs 5.3%) and thrombocytopenia (4.2% vs 0.8%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (1.5%), and gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%).

Clinically relevant adverse reaction reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI was gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%), including 4 fatal events.

Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were evaluated in 224 patients (115 CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients and 109 placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients) with normal baseline TSH levels. Increased TSH levels were observed in 53 (46%) patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI compared with 4 (4%) patients treated with placebo with FOLFIRI.

REACH-2:

The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated HCC patients at a rate of ≥10% and ≥2% higher than placebo were fatigue (36% vs 20%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), hypertension (25% vs 13%), abdominal pain (25% vs 16%), decreased appetite (23% vs 20%), proteinuria (20% vs 4%), nausea (19% vs 12%), ascites (18% vs 7%), headache (14% vs 5%), epistaxis (14% vs 3%), insomnia (11% vs 6%), pyrexia (10% vs 3%), vomiting (10% vs 7%), and back pain (10% vs 7%).

The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were ascites (3%) and pneumonia (3%).

Treatment discontinuations due to adverse reactions occurred in 18% of CYRAMZA-treated patients, with proteinuria being the most frequent (2%).

Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <10% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REACH-2 were IRR (9%), hepatic encephalopathy (5%) including 1 fatal event, and hepatorenal syndrome (2%) including 1 fatal event.

RB-P HCP ISI 29MAY2020

Please see full U.S. Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

U.S. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR RETEVMO® (selpercatinib)

Hepatotoxicity: Serious hepatic adverse reactions occurred in 2.6% of patients treated with Retevmo. Increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) occurred in 51% of patients, including Grade 3 or 4 events in 8% and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) occurred in 45% of patients, including Grade 3 or 4 events in 9%. The median time to first onset for increased AST was 4.1 weeks (range: 5 days to 2 years) and increased ALT was 4.1 weeks (range: 6 days to 1.5 years). Monitor ALT and AST prior to initiating Retevmo, every 2 weeks during the first 3 months, then monthly thereafter and as clinically indicated. Withhold, reduce dose or permanently discontinue Retevmo based on the severity.

Hypertension occurred in 35% of patients, including Grade 3 hypertension in 17% and Grade 4 in one (0.1%) patient. Overall, 4.6% had their dose interrupted and 1.3% had their dose reduced for hypertension. Treatment-emergent hypertension was most commonly managed with anti-hypertension medications. Do not initiate Retevmo in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Optimize blood pressure prior to initiating Retevmo. Monitor blood pressure after 1 week, at least monthly thereafter, and as clinically indicated. Initiate or adjust anti-hypertensive therapy as appropriate. Withhold, reduce dose, or permanently discontinue Retevmo based on the severity.

Retevmo can cause concentration-dependent QT interval prolongation. An increase in QTcF interval to >500 ms was measured in 6% of patients and an increase in the QTcF interval of at least 60 ms over baseline was measured in 15% of patients. Retevmo has not been studied in patients with clinically significant active cardiovascular disease or recent myocardial infarction. Monitor patients who are at significant risk of developing QTc prolongation, including patients with known long QT syndromes, clinically significant bradyarrhythmias, and severe or uncontrolled heart failure. Assess QT interval, electrolytes and TSH at baseline and periodically during treatment, adjusting frequency based upon risk factors including diarrhea. Correct hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia prior to initiating Retevmo and during treatment. Monitor the QT interval more frequently when Retevmo is concomitantly administered with strong and moderate CYP3A inhibitors or drugs known to prolong QTc interval. Withhold and dose reduce or permanently discontinue Retevmo based on the severity.

Serious, including fatal, hemorrhagic events can occur with Retevmo. Grade ≥3 hemorrhagic events occurred in 2.3% of patients treated with Retevmo including 3 (0.4%) patients with fatal hemorrhagic events, including one case each of cerebral hemorrhage, tracheostomy site hemorrhage, and hemoptysis. Permanently discontinue Retevmo in patients with severe or life-threatening hemorrhage.

Hypersensitivity occurred in 4.3% of patients receiving Retevmo, including Grade 3 hypersensitivity in 1.6%. The median time to onset was 1.7 weeks (range 6 days to 1.5 years). Signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity included fever, rash and arthralgias or myalgias with concurrent decreased platelets or transaminitis. If hypersensitivity occurs, withhold Retevmo and begin corticosteroids at a dose of 1 mg/kg prednisone (or equivalent). Upon resolution of the event, resume Retevmo at a reduced dose and increase the dose of Retevmo by 1 dose level each week as tolerated until reaching the dose taken prior to onset of hypersensitivity. Continue steroids until patient reaches target dose and then taper. Permanently discontinue Retevmo for recurrent hypersensitivity.

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) occurred in 1% of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma receiving Retevmo. Patients may be at risk of TLS if they have rapidly growing tumors, a high tumor burden, renal dysfunction, or dehydration. Closely monitor patients at risk, consider appropriate prophylaxis including hydration, and treat as clinically indicated.

Impaired wound healing can occur in patients who receive drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway. Therefore, Retevmo has the potential to adversely affect wound healing. Withhold Retevmo for at least 7 days prior to elective surgery. Do not administer for at least 2 weeks following major surgery and until adequate wound healing. The safety of resumption of Retevmo after resolution of wound healing complications has not been established.

Based on data from animal reproduction studies and its mechanism of action, Retevmo can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Administration of selpercatinib to pregnant rats during organogenesis at maternal exposures that were approximately equal to those observed at the recommended human dose of 160 mg twice daily resulted in embryolethality and malformations. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential and males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Retevmo and for at least 1 week after the final dose. There are no data on the presence of selpercatinib or its metabolites in human milk or on their effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with Retevmo and for 1 week after the final dose.

Severe adverse reactions (Grade 3-4) occurring in ≥15% of patients who received Retevmo in LIBRETTO-001, were hypertension (18%), prolonged QT interval (4%), diarrhea (3.4%), dyspnea (2.3%), fatigue (2%), abdominal pain (1.9%), hemorrhage (1.9%), headache (1.4%), rash (0.7%), constipation (0.6%), nausea (0.6%), vomiting (0.3%), and edema (0.3%).

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 33% of patients who received Retevmo. The most frequently reported serious adverse reaction (in ≥ 2% of patients) was pneumonia.

Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3% of patients; fatal adverse reactions which occurred in >1 patient included sepsis (n=3), cardiac arrest (n=3) and respiratory failure (n=3).

Common adverse reactions (all grades) occurring in ≥15% of patients who received Retevmo in LIBRETTO-001, were dry mouth (39%), diarrhea (37%), hypertension (35%), fatigue (35%), edema (35%), rash (27%), constipation (25%), nausea (23%), abdominal pain (23%), headache (23%), cough (18%), prolonged QT interval (17%), dyspnea (16%), vomiting (15%), and hemorrhage (15%).

Laboratory abnormalities (all grades; Grade 3-4) ≥20% worsening from baseline in patients who received Retevmo in LIBRETTO-001, were AST increased (51%; 8%), ALT increased (45%; 9%), increased glucose (44%; 2.2%), decreased leukocytes (43%; 1.6%), decreased albumin (42%; 0.7%), decreased calcium (41%; 3.8%), increased creatinine (37%; 1.0%), increased alkaline phosphatase (36%; 2.3%), decreased platelets (33%; 2.7%), increased total cholesterol (31%; 0.1%), decreased sodium (27%; 7%), decreased magnesium (24%; 0.6%), increased potassium (24%; 1.2%), increased bilirubin (23%; 2.0%), and decreased glucose (22%; 0.7%).

Concomitant use of acid-reducing agents decreases selpercatinib plasma concentrations which may reduce Retevmo anti-tumor activity. Avoid concomitant use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonists, and locally-acting antacids with Retevmo. If coadministration cannot be avoided, take Retevmo with food (with a PPI) or modify its administration time (with a H2 receptor antagonist or a locally-acting antacid).

Concomitant use of strong and moderate CYP3A inhibitors increases selpercatinib plasma concentrations which may increase the risk of Retevmo adverse reactions including QTc interval prolongation. Avoid concomitant use of strong and moderate CYP3A inhibitors with Retevmo. If concomitant use of a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor cannot be avoided, reduce the Retevmo dosage as recommended and monitor the QT interval with ECGs more frequently.

Concomitant use of strong and moderate CYP3A inducers decreases selpercatinib plasma concentrations which may reduce Retevmo anti-tumor activity. Avoid coadministration of Retevmo with strong and moderate CYP3A inducers.

Concomitant use of Retevmo with CYP2C8 and CYP3A substrates increases their plasma concentrations which may increase the risk of adverse reactions related to these substrates. Avoid coadministration of Retevmo with CYP2C8 and CYP3A substrates where minimal concentration changes may lead to increased adverse reactions. If coadministration cannot be avoided, follow recommendations for CYP2C8 and CYP3A substrates provided in their approved product labeling.

The safety and effectiveness of Retevmo have not been established in pediatric patients less than 12 years of age. The safety and effectiveness of Retevmo have been established in pediatric patients aged 12 years and older for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) who require systemic therapy and for advanced RET fusion-positive thyroid cancer who require systemic therapy and are radioactive iodine-refractory (if radioactive iodine is appropriate). Use of Retevmo for these indications is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies in adults with additional pharmacokinetic and safety data in pediatric patients aged 12 years and older.  Monitor open growth plates in adolescent patients. Consider interrupting or discontinuing Retevmo if abnormalities occur.

No dosage modification is recommended for patients with mild to severe renal impairment (estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate [eGFR] ≥15 to 89 mL/min, estimated by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease [MDRD] equation). A recommended dosage has not been established for patients with end-stage renal disease.

Reduce the dose when administering Retevmo to patients with severe hepatic impairment (total bilirubin greater than 3 to 10 times upper limit of normal [ULN] and any AST). No dosage modification is recommended for patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment. Monitor for Retevmo-related adverse reactions in patients with hepatic impairment.

SE HCP ISI All_25MAR2021

Please see full U.S. Prescribing Information for Retevmo.

Note:

TYVYT® (sintilimab injection) is not an approved product in the United States.

BYVASDA® (bevacizumab biosimilar injection), SULINNO®, and HALPRYZA® (rituximab biosimilar injection) are not approved products in the United States.

TYVYT® (sintilimab injection, Innovent)

BYVASDA® (bevacizumab biosimilar injection, Innovent)

HALPRYZA® (rituximab biosimilar injection, Innovent)

SULINNO® (adalimumab biosimilar injection, Innovent)

Pemazyre® (pemigatinib oral inhibitor, Incyte Corporation). Pemazyre® was discovered by Incyte Corporation and licensed to Innovent for development and commercialization in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

Disclaimer:

For medical and healthcare professionals only.

Innovent’s Forward-Looking Statements

This news release may contain certain forward-looking statements that are, by their nature, subject to significant risks and uncertainties. The words “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “intend” and similar expressions, as they relate to Innovent, are intended to identify certain of such forward-looking statements. Innovent does not intend to update these forward-looking statements regularly.

These forward-looking statements are based on the existing beliefs, assumptions, expectations, estimates, projections and understandings of the management of Innovent with respect to future events at the time these statements are made. These statements are not a guarantee of future developments and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, some of which are beyond Innovent’s control and are difficult to predict. Consequently, actual results may differ materially from information contained in the forward-looking statements as a result of future changes or developments in our business, Innovent’s competitive environment and political, economic, legal and social conditions.

Innovent, the Directors and the employees of Innovent assume (a) no obligation to correct or update the forward-looking statements contained in this site; and (b) no liability in the event that any of the forward-looking statements does not materialize or turn out to be incorrect.

Eli Lilly and Company Forward-Looking Statement

This press release contains forward-looking statements (as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995) about the benefits of a collaboration between Lilly and Innovent, Lilly’s research and development strategy, and potential payments in connection with the collaboration, and reflects Lilly’s current beliefs and expectations. However, as with any such undertaking, there are substantial risks and uncertainties in the process of drug research, development and commercialization. Among other things, there can be no assurance that the collaboration will achieve Lilly’s objectives, that Lilly will realize the expected benefits of the collaboration, or that Lilly will execute its strategy as planned. For a further discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from Lilly’s expectations, please see Lilly’s most recent Forms 10-K and 10-Q filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Lilly undertakes no duty to update forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, Lilly undertakes no duty to update forward-looking statements to reflect events after the date of this release.